2019-2020 Course List

Content AreaCourse Name (see descriptions below)SD Course CodeCreditCostPrerequisite
CTEAccounting A121040.5$350None
CTEAccounting B121040.5$350None
CTEAudio Video Production 1 A111510.5$350None
CTEAudio Video Production 1 B111510.5$350None
CTEChild Development and Parenting A190510.5$350None
CTEChild Development and Parenting B190510.5$350Child Dev. and Parenting A
CTEComputer Programming I A101520.5$350Prin. of Information Tech
CTEComputer Programming I B101520.5$350CompProgramming I A
CTEComputing for College and Careers A100050.5$350None
CTEComputing for College and Careers B100050.5$350Comp College/Careers A
CTECulinary Arts 1 A160530.5$350None
CTECulinary Arts 1 B160530.5$350Culinary Arts 1 A
CTEEntrepreneurship A120530.5$350None
CTEEntrepreneurship B120530.5$350Entrepreneurship A
CTEGraphic Design and Illustration A111550.5$350Prin. of A/V Tech/Comm.
CTEGraphic Design and Illustration B111550.5$350Graphic Dsgn/Illustr., A.
CTEHospitality and Tourism Mangagement160510.5$350None
CTEInternational Business120560.5$350None
CTEPersonal Finance192620.5$350None
CTEPrinciples of AV Technology and Communications A110010.5$350None
CTEPrinciples of AV Technology and Communications B110010.5$350Prin. of A/V Tech/Comm A.
CTEPrinciples of Education and Training A191510.5$350None
CTEPrinciples of Education and Training B191510.5$350None
CTEPrinciples of Hospitality and Tourism A160010.5$350None
CTEPrinciples of Hospitality and Tourism B160010.5$350Prin Hosp/Tourism A
CTEPrinciples of Human Services A190010.5$350None
CTEPrinciples of Human Services B190010.5$350Prin of Human Srvc A
CTEPrinciples of Information Technology A100030.5$350None
CTEPrinciples of Information Technology B100030.5$350None
CTESports and Entertainment Marketing121630.5$350None
CTEVeterinary Science181010.5$395None
CTEWeb Technologies A102010.5$350Prin of Info Tech
CTEWeb Technologies B102010.5$350Prin of Web Tech A
ElectiveAcademic Success220030.5$350None
ElectiveCareer Explorations221510.5$350None
Fine ArtArt History and Appreciation051520.5$350None
Fine ArtArt in World Cultures051540.5$395None
Fine ArtMusic Appreciation051160.5$350None
HealthNutrition and Wellness080510.5$350None
HealthPhysical Education080010.5$350None
Language ArtsCreative Writing011040.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 9 A010010.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 9 B010010.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 10 A010020.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 10 B010020.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 11 A010030.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 11 B010030.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 12 A010040.5$350None
Language ArtsEnglish 12 B010040.5$350None
Language ArtsGothic Literature010650.5$395None
Language ArtsPublic Speaking11510.5$350None
MathPre-Algebra A020510.5$350None
MathPre-Algebra B020510.5$350None
MathAlgebra 1 A020520.5$350None
MathAlgebra 1 B020520.5$350None
MathAlgebra 2 A020560.5$350Algebra 1 or equivalent
MathAlgebra 2 B020560.5$350Algebra 1 or equivalent
MathGeometry A020720.5$350None
MathGeometry B020720.5$350None
MathIntegrated Math 1 A020620.5$350None
MathIntegrated Math 1 B020620.5$350None
MathIntegrated Math 2 A020630.5$350None
MathIntegrated Math 2 B020630.5$350None
MathIntegrated Math 3 A020640.5$350None
MathIntegrated Math 3 B020640.5$350None
MathConsumer Mathematics021570.5$350None
MathPrecalculus A021100.5$350None
MathPrecalculus B021100.5$350None
MathProbability and Statistics022010.5$350None
ScienceBiology A030510.5$350None
ScienceBiology B030510.5$350None
ScienceChemistry A031010.5$350None
ScienceChemistry B031010.5$350None
ScienceEarth and Space Science A030010.5$350None
ScienceEarth and Space Science B030010.5$350None
SciencePhysical Science A031590.5$350None
SciencePhysical Science B031590.5$350None
SciencePhysics A031510.5$350Alg I and Geom or equiv.
SciencePhysics B031510.5$350Alg I and Geom or equiv.
Social StudiesAnthropology042510.5$350None
Social StudiesArchaeology042520.5$395None
Social StudiesCivics A041610.5$350None
Social StudiesCivics B041610.5$350None
Social StudiesContemporary World A04064$350None
Social StudiesContemporary World A04064$350None
Social StudiesEconomics042010.5$350None
Social StudiesPhilosophy043060.5$395None
Social StudiesPsychology A042540.5$350None
Social StudiesPsychology B042540.5$350None
Social StudiesSocial Problems I042590.5$395None
Social StudiesSocial Problems II042590.5$395Social Problems I
Social StudiesSociology I042580.5$395None
Social StudiesSociology II042580.5$395Sociology I
Social StudiesUS Government041510.5$350None
Social StudiesUS History A041010.5$350None
Social StudiesUS History B041010.5$350None
Social StudiesWorld Geography A040010.5$350None
Social StudiesWorld Geography B040010.5$350None
Social StudiesWorld History A040510.5$350None
Social StudiesWorld History B040510.5$350None
World LanguageGerman 1 A242520.5$350None
World LanguageGerman 1 B242520.5$350None
World LanguageGerman 2 A242530.5$350German 1 or equivalent
World LanguageGerman 2 B242530.5$350German 1 or equivalent
World LanguageSpanish 1 A240520.5$350None
World LanguageSpanish 1 B240520.5$350None
World LanguageSpanish 2 A240530.5$350Spanish 1 or equivalent
World LanguageSpanish 2 B240530.5$350Spanish 1 or equivalent
World LanguageSpanish 3 A240540.5$350Spanish 2 or equivalent
World LanguageSpanish 3 B240540.5$350Spanish 2 or equivalent
World LanguageChinese 1 A244020.5$350None
World LanguageChinese 1 B244020.5$350None
World LanguageChinese 2 A244030.5$350Chinese 1
World LanguageChinese 2 B244030.5$350Chinese 1
World LanguageFrench 1 A241020.5$350None
World LanguageFrench 1 B241020.5$350None
World LanguageFrench 2 A241030.5$350French 1
World LanguageFrench 2 B241030.5$350French 1
World LanguageFrench 3 A241030.5$350French 2
World LanguageFrench 3B241030.5$350French 2
World LanguageLatin 1 A243420.5$350None
World LanguageLatin 1 B243420.5$350None
World LanguageLatin 2 A243430.5$350Latin 1
World LanguageLatin 2 B243430.5$350Latin 1
Credit RecoveryAlgebra 1 A – CR020520.5$225None
Credit RecoveryAlgebra 1 B – CR020520.5$225None
Credit RecoveryAlgebra 2 A – CR020560.5$225Alegra 1 or equivalent
Credit RecoveryAlgebra 2 B – CR020560.5$225Alegra 1 or equivalent
Credit RecoveryBiology A – CR030510.5$225None
Credit RecoveryBiology B – CR030510.5$225None
Credit RecoveryChemistry A – CR031010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryChemistry B – CR031010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEarth and Space Science A – CR030010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEarth and Space Science B – CR030010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEconomics – CR042010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 9 A – CR010010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 9 B – CR010010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 10 A – CR010020.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 10 B -CR010020.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 11 A – CR010030.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 11 B – CR010030.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 12 A – CR010040.5$225None
Credit RecoveryEnglish 12 B – CR010040.5$225None
Credit RecoveryGeometry A – CR020720.5$225Algebra 1 or equivalent
Credit RecoveryGeometry B – CR020720.5$225Algebra 1 or equivalent
Credit RecoveryIntegrated Math 1 A – CR020620.5$225None
Credit RecoveryIntegrated Math 1 B – CR020620.5$225None
Credit RecoveryIntegrated Math 2 A – CR020630.5$225None
Credit RecoveryIntegrated Math 2 B – CR020630.5$225None
Credit RecoveryIntegrated Math 3 A – CR020640.5$225None
Credit RecoveryIntegrated Math 3 B – CR020640.5$225None
Credit RecoveryPhysical Science A – CR031590.5$225None
Credit RecoveryPhysical Science B – CR031590.5$225None
Credit RecoverySpanish 1 A – CR240520.5$225None
Credit RecoverySpanish 1 B – CR240520.5$225None
Credit RecoveryUS Government – CR041510.5$225None
Credit RecoveryUS History A – CR041010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryUS History B – CR041010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryWorld Geography A – CR040010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryWorld Geography B – CR040010.5$225None
Credit RecoveryWorld History A – CR040510.5$225None
Credit RecoveryWorld History B – CR040510.5$225None

Course Descriptions

CTE

The Accounting, Semester A course is intended to help you familiarize yourself with the basics of accounting. This course has 15 lessons organized into four units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. Additionally, there is one Course Activity that you need to work on throughout the duration of the course. This activity is a long-term project spread over the length of the course. The due date for this activity is to be determined by the course instructor. This course covers the fundamentals of bookkeeping and financial statements. It also covers career opportunities and the key government regulations in the accounting field.

The Accounting, Semester B course is intended to help you understand the accounting functions specific to different kinds of businesses. This course has ten lessons organized into three units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. Additionally, there is one Course Activity that you need to work on throughout the duration of the course. This activity is a long-term project spread over the length of the course. The due date for this activity is to be determined by the course instructor. This course covers the accounting functions of different business types and the specialized accounting tasks related to them. It also covers and the essentials interpersonal and workplace skills required as a professional in this field.

The Audio Video Production 1, Semester B course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand and apply the various techniques used in audio video production. This course has 14 lessons organized into three units, plus three Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover various topics in audio video production, such as directing techniques, editing and mastering techniques, file management and delivery formats, advanced camera and lighting techniques, and techniques for providing special effects.

The Audio Video Production 1, Semester A course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand the skills required to achieve success in modern-day careers. This course has 18 lessons organized into four units, plus four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover various topics in audio video production, such as camera techniques, audio techniques, lighting techniques, editing, and video assembly.

Child Development and Parenting, Semester A is intended to help you familiarize yourself with various aspects of child development and parenting. This course has 12 lessons organized into three units, plus three Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers fundamental concepts of parenting and child rearing. It also covers essential communication skills related to parent-child interaction. In addition, the course covers workplace skills, such as positive work ethics, integrity, and resource management. It also covers some recent trends in parenting.

Child Development and Parenting, Semester B is intended to help you familiarize yourself with the various stages of child development as well as the factors that obstruct healthy development of a child. This course has thirteen lessons organized into three units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course explains the development, health, nutrition, and safety of children at various stages. In addition, the course covers career opportunities in the field of childcare and development.

The Computer Programming, Semester A course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand the concepts and techniques associated with computer programming. This course has four Units with 15 lessons and four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course describes the skills and training required for careers in computer programming and the work ethics required in a computing environment. This course describes number systems, data types, and functions used in computation. In addition, this course describes types of programming paradigms and program structures. Finally, this course explains how to create web pages in HTML and how to do create a JavaScript program.

The Computer Programming, Semester B course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand various phases of the software development life cycle (SDLC). This course has four Units with 14 lessons and four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course describes various phases of the SDLC such as analysis, design, development, testing, and implementation. This course describes software development methodologies, various types of project plans, Unified Modeling Language (UML) design, various types of testing, and system implementation. This course also identifies various security threats and risks to computer systems and the methods to mitigate them.

The Computing for College and Careers, Semester A course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand the basic computer skills required during your college education and when pursuing a career. This course has 20 lessons organized into five units, plus five Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover basic computer hardware and software and productivity applications such as word processing software, spreadsheet software, and presentation software. This course also covers the Internet and emerging technologies.

The Computing for College and Careers, Semester B course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand some of the advanced computer skills required during your college education or when pursuing a career. This course has 14 lessons organized into three units, plus three Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover advanced concepts, such as computer networks, complex operations in spreadsheet and database programs, and the process of creating a website.

Culinary Arts I, Semester A is intended to help you learn culinary skills. This course has 20 lessons organized into 5 units, plus 5 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers the history and development of the culinary arts; the basics of nutrition; and health, safety, and sanitation. It covers basic science principles used in cooking and various cooking methods. It also explores the culinary skills required to make a variety of items, ranging from stocks and soups to seafood and poultry to various breads and desserts.

Culinary Arts I, Semester B is intended to help you learn culinary skills. This course has 14 lessons organized into 4 units, plus 4 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers menu planning, food presentation, and different service styles. It covers the running of food service establishments and kitchen management skills. It explores the personal skills and professional traits needed in the food service industry. It also covers career opportunities and career management skills.

The Entrepreneurship, Semester A course is intended to help you understand the components of a business plan, ideation and innovation in products and pricing, the market research process, and various management functions of operations management. The course has 18 lessons organized into 4 units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. Additionally, the course ends with a comprehensive Course Activity. This course will cover the roles and attributes of an entrepreneur, marketing and its components, the selling process, and operations management.

The Entrepreneurship, Semester B course is intended to help you understand the concept of accounting and its role in business, different firm ownership structures, importance of business ethics, and the scope and importance of quality management. The course has 17 lessons organized into 4 units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover the different types of capital that a business needs at different stages, nature of legally binding contracts, different functions of the human resources division of a company, and the types of risks that entrepreneurs have to face.

The Graphic Design & Illustration, Semester A course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand graphic design concepts, graphic image creation, and image manipulation. This course has 14 lessons organized into 4 units, plus 4 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers careers you can pursue in graphic design. It also covers training and skills required for a graphic designer. In addition, this course describes how to create images using color and typography and how to manipulate images. It also guides you how to create images using design elements and principles. Finally, this course covers copyright laws and ethics related to the use of graphic design.

The Graphic Design & Illustration, Semester B course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand advanced concepts of graphic design, including the creation of graphic products such as logos, posters, and magazine covers. The course will also help you explore concepts of multimedia and digital photography. This course has 14 lessons organized into 4 units, plus 4 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover the advanced manipulation of images. It will guide you on how to create graphic products such as logos, posters, and magazine covers. This course also covers multimedia and digital photography. In addition, the course covers art criticism in graphic artwork, digital publishing, and the creation of graphic design portfolio.

Hospitality and Tourism Management With greater disposable income and more opportunities for business travel, people are traversing the globe in growing numbers. As a result, hospitality and tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. This course will introduce students to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Student will learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.

International Business From geography to culture Global Business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course is designed to help students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace.It takes a global view on business, investigating why and how companies go international and are more interconnected.

The Personal Finance course is intended to help you familiarize yourself with the basic and essential concepts of personal finance. This course has 15 lessons organized into three units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. Additionally, there is one Course Activity that you need to work on throughout the duration of the course. This activity is a long-term project spread over the length of the course. The due date for this activity is to be determined by the course instructor. This course covers the fundamentals of personal finance, role of consumers in the economic
system of the United States, financial planning in personal life, ways to manage finances, and different investment strategies. It also covers various career options available in the field of personal finance.

The Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications, Semester A course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand the skills required for achieving success in modern-day careers in the arts, audio/video technology, and communications cluster. This course has 18 lessons organized into four units, plus four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover various topics in the arts, audio/video technology, and communication career cluster.

The Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications, Semester B course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand the skills required for achieving success in modern-day careers in the arts, audio/video technology, and communications cluster. This course has 16 lessons organized into four units, plus four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover various topics in the arts, audio/video technology, and communication career cluster.

Principles of Education and Training, Semester A is intended to help you familiarize yourself with the career opportunities in the education and training career cluster. This course has fifteen lessons organized into four units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers career opportunities in the three pathways in the education and training cluster, such as administration, education, and professional support. In addition, the course covers personal and professional skills that are necessary to carry out career roles in this field.

Principles of Education and Training, Semester B is intended to help you familiarize yourself with the teaching strategies as well as the importance of child growth and development for educators. This course has thirteen lessons organized into four units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course explains the development, health, nutrition, and safety of children. In addition, the course covers teaching strategies as well as technologies that can aid educators.

Principles of Hospitality, Semester A is intended to help you familiarize yourself with the hospitality and tourism industry. This course has eighteen lessons organized into four units. Each unit has a Unit Activity, and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover the history, diversity, components, and career opportunities in the hospitality and tourism industry.

Principles of Hospitality, Semester B is intended to help you familiarize yourself with the personal and professional skills and qualities needed for a career in the hospitality and tourism industry. This course has sixteen lessons organized into three units. Each unit has a Unit Activity and each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover interpersonal and communication skills, professional skills, and career opportunities in the hospitality and tourism industry.

Principles of Human Services, Semester A is intended to help you gain familiarity with career opportunities in the human services career cluster. This course has 16 lessons organized into 4 units, plus 4 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers the various career pathways in human services, such as counseling, mental health services, and consumer services. In addition, the course covers workplace skills, such as a positive work ethic, integrity, budgeting basics, self-representation, and teamwork.

Principles of Human Services, Semester B is intended to help you gain familiarity with career opportunities in the human services career cluster. This course has 15 lessons organized into 4 units, plus 4 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers the various career pathways in human services, such as childcare, family services, and personal care services. In addition, the course covers various workplace skills, such as customer service and internet and information technology skills.

The Principles of Information Technology, Semester A course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand some of the principle skills of information technology required during your college education. This course has 18 lessons organized into four units, plus four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover principle concepts, such as basic computer hardware and information system software, desktop publishing, database management system, the Internet, privacy and legality in the context of online media, and social networking in the context of professional reach.

The Principles of Information Technology, Semester B course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand some of the advanced information technology skills required during your college education. This course has 20 lessons organized into five units, plus five Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover advanced concepts, such as organizational structure and management functions in IT, as well as legal and ethical procedures that apply to information technology. Further, the course will also explore emerging technologies and programming software, and networking technology. Finally, you will explore advanced productivity applications, and web design and development.

The Sports and Entertainment Marketing course is intended to help you gain an insight into the field of sports, entertainment, and recreation marketing. This course has 16 lessons organized into four units, plus four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. Additionally, there is one Course Activity that you need to work on throughout the duration of the course. This activity is a long-term project spread over the length of the course. The due date for this activity is to be determined by the course instructor This course covers fundamental concepts in sports, entertainment, and recreation marketing. It also covers essential skills related to advertising, sponsorship, and marketing campaigns. In addition, the course covers crucial workplace skills, such as teamwork and leadership skills.

Veterinary Science As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. Taking a look at the pets that live in our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, this course will examine some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times…we humans as well! Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues is studied and applied.

The Web Technologies, Semester A course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand the concepts of website design. This course guides you how to create a website using web technologies. This course has 14 lessons organized into 4 units, plus 4 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover careers in web technology, uses of web technology, and emerging trends in web technology. It also covers principles of design and creation of graphics. In addition, the course covers Internet protocols, web development tools, and client-server processing. The course also covers web page creation using HTML and style sheets. Finally, the course covers website design and the web development process.

The Web Technologies, Semester B course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you understand advanced concepts of website design and concepts related to desktop publishing and multimedia. This course has 14 lessons organized into 4 units, plus 4 Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course covers the creation of desktop publishing and multimedia projects. It also covers legal and ethical issues related to the Internet and website design. In addition, this course covers web page creation using JavaScript. It also covers DHTML and XML. The course additionally covers how to gather requirements from the client, plan out website development, create a wireframe, and create and publish a website. Finally, the course covers web maintenance and web administration.


ELECTIVE

Academic Success This one-semester elective course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you improve your study habits and enhance your prospects for academic success, now and in the future. This course is not divided into units and doesn’t have pretests by which you can earn credit. Instead, it is designed to help you improve your study skills regardless of your skill level at the time that you take the course. It is structured into lessons and Course Activities as follows: The first five lessons are about specific aspects of studying. Before and after these lessons, you will assess your study habits in two Course Activities. The last three lessons focus on writing as a process and using that process to write a research paper. The lessons are followed by a Course Activity in which you will submit a research paper.

Career Explorations This one-semester course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to career exploration and planning. This course has 16 lessons organized into four units, plus four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. The course ends with a Course Activity in which you will create two essential components of a career portfolio: a résumé and a cover letter for applying for an entry-level job in your chosen career. This course covers all of the career clusters in the National Career Clusters Framework. You’ll explore the career pathways within each cluster, determine the academic and skill requirements for different career pathways, and learn about the jobs available in each pathway and the work these professionals do. This course will also guide you through the process of creating an academic and career plan based on you interests, abilities, and life goals.


FINE ART

Art History and Appreciation Art has played a significant role in every major civilization throughout the history of man. The emergence of different art forms often reflects the values that a civilization deems important: religion, labor, love, political change, or even commerce. Since artwork and cultural values are so closely related, studying art is a compelling way to learn about the people who produced it.

Art in World Cultures Who is the greatest artist of all time? Is it Leonardo daVinci? Claude Monet? Michelangelo? Pablo Picasso? Is the greatest artist of all time someone whose name has been lost to history? You will learn about some of the greatest artists while also creating art of your own, including digital art. We will explore the basic principles and elements ofart, learn how to critique art, and examine some of the traditional art of the Americas, Africa, and Oceania in addition to the development of Western art.

Music Appreciation This one-semester elective course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to introduce you to the field of music appreciation. You’ll first identify elements and patterns in music and learn to identify various elements of musical notation. Next, you’ll explore the history and evolution of music from the Middle Ages through to the modern era. Then, you’ll learn about the influence of music on society and culture. Finally, in the last few lessons you’ll learn of the various compositional and expressive devices and how to evaluate a concert.


HEALTH

Nutrition and Wellness This one-semester course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide. It has 17 lessons organized into four units, plus four Unit Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. This course will cover basic knowledge about nutrition and wellness such as basic concepts of nutrition, the digestive and metabolic processes, nutrient requirements, dietary guidelines, importance of physical fitness, community health issues, food management, and careers in the field of nutrition and wellness.

Physical Education Your body is a machine that has certain needs—if you treat it well, it should be able to serve you well. But what can you do to promote a fit and healthy body? A course in physical education can show you. By definition, physical education is instruction in exercise and physical activity. It teaches you how to maintain your personal fitness, how to measure different aspects of physical fitness, and how to avoid injury while exercising. It’s all about getting active and setting your body in motion. By measuring health and fitness with objective data, it’s possible to improve your health in a methodical way. Exercise helps you feel good about yourself and helps you sidestep the health problems that often accompany poor levels of fitness.


LANGUAGE

Creative Writing This one-semester elective course is intended as a practical, hands-on guide to help you learn and sharpen your skills as a creative writer. This course has 13 lessons and nine Course Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. In Creative Writing, you will learn about the scope of creative writing and its genres. You will identify the key elements of prose and poetry. You will look at writing for stage, film, and TV. You will learn about theatrical and film techniques, as well as technical effects that are typically used in electronic media. You will look at writing for younger audiences, for advertising, and journalism. You will learn how the publishing industry works. At key points in this course, you will get to assess your own original writing (either through self review against a set of guidelines or by a peer) and revise it before submission to the instructor. You will notice that extended writing tasks are typically planned for in the lesson activity and actually written in the course activity that follows. This is a writing intensive course. You will spend about 60 percent of your time doing original writing, reviewing, and rewriting. You will do a good deal of your original writing in the course activities.

English 9A – English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 9A, you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and
writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In English 9A, you will read and analyze literature in different genres as well as practice skills related to good study habits. You will sharpen your writing skills as you evaluate literary works with regard to literary technique, form, and theme.

In English 9B, you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In English 9B, you will read and analyze Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, as well as read speeches and essays to evaluate their arguments. You will write evaluations of literary works with regard to literary techniques, form, and theme.

English 10A – English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 10A you will explore the different literary devices used in short stories, such as subject,
theme, mood, plot, and narration. You will read and analyze a variety of literary works to learn more about a particular literary device. The second unit covers many types of informational texts. In the third unit, you will read and study drama from a range of eras. In addition, you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills. In English 10A, you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics.

English 10B – English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 10B you will explore characteristics of different genres of fiction, such as realistic fiction,
historical fiction, and science fiction, and analyze historical context, theme, and genre in Franz Kafka’s novella The Metamorphosis. The second unit covers many types of nonfiction writing, including memoirs, personal essays, public essays, speeches, and narrative nonfiction. In the third unit, you will analyze traits and genres of poetry. In addition, you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills. In English 10B, you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics.

English 11A – English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 11A you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and
writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In English 11A, you will read and analyze different genres in literature with an emphasis on American literary movements over time. You will also complete writing activities to evaluate literary works with regard to literary techniques, form, and theme.

In English 11B you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, and narrative. In English 11B, you will read and analyze a variety of literary genres with an emphasis on modern American literature and literary movements. You will also complete writing activities to evaluate various literary works in regard to literary techniques, form, and theme.

English 12A – English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 12A you will explore the relation between British history and literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the neoclassical era, including the works of Shakespeare. You will read and analyze a variety of literary works from this time period using relevant cultural and political history presented in each lesson. In English 12A you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In addition you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills.

English 12B – English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 12B you will explore the relation between British history and literature from the romantic period to the modern era. You will read and analyze a variety of literary works from this time period in the context of relevant cultural and political history. In English 12B you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In addition you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills.

Gothic Literature – Since the eighteenth century, Gothic tales have influenced fiction writers and fascinated readers. This course focuses on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrates how the core writing drivers produce a suspenseful environment for readers. Some of the recurring themes and elements found in the genre are also presented. As they complete the course, students gain an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of Gothic literature.

Public Speaking – Students are introduced to public speaking as an important component of their academic, work, and social lives. They study public speaking occasions and develop skills as fair and critical listeners, or consumers, of spoken information and persuasion. Students study types of speeches (informative, persuasive, dramatic, and special occasion), read and listen to models of speeches, and prepare and present their own speeches to diverse audiences. Students learn to choose speaking topics and adapt them for specific audiences, to research and support their ideas, and to benefit from listener feedback. They study how to incorporate well-designed visual and multimedia aids in presentations and how to maintain a credible presence in the digital world. Students also learn about the ethics of public speaking and about techniques for managing communication anxiety.


MATHEMATICS

Pre-Algebra A – Mathematics is the study of patterns around us. In Math 8 (Pre-Algebra), Semester A, you will explore transformations and solve linear equations. You will also solve real-world problems with two linear equations. In this course, you will study and interpret functions that can help you solve problems you encounter in everyday life.

Pre-Algebra B – Mathematics is the study of patterns around us. In Math 8 (Pre-Algebra), Semester B, you will study the use of scientific notation and learn to use roots appropriately. You will also plot and compare irrational numbers and simplify expressions with irrational numbers. You will also explore the Pythagorean Theorem and probability, which you can use to solve realworld problems.

Algebra 1, Semester A, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on the relationships of linear and nonlinear equations. You’ll learn to create, graph, and solve linear and exponential equations and inequalities. You’ll also use function notation to describe relationships between quantities and interpret function notation accurately to solve problems. Toward the end of this course, you’ll study transformations of linear and exponential functions.

Algebra 1, Semester B, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on the relationship of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions. You will create, graph, and solve quadratic equations and inequalities in one or two variables. You will also add, subtract, and multiply linear and quadratic polynomials. At the end of this course, you’ll interpret, analyze, and build functions.

Algebra 2, Semester A, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on the interpretation of polynomial and rational expressions. You’ll learn to create, graph, and solve equations and inequalities. You’ll also identify the key features of different types of functions and analyze them with tables, graphs, and equations.

Algebra 2, Semester B, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on function transformations on the coordinate plane, the inverse of functions, and the properties of functions. You’ll learn to create and graph trigonometric functions and identify their key features. Toward the end of this course, you will build your understanding of the key concepts of probability and statistics.

In Geometry A, you will explore rigid and non-rigid transformations of figures in the coordinate plane and use them to establish congruence and similarity of triangles and other shapes. You will also prove theorems about lines, angles, triangles, and parallelograms, and build geometric constructions using both basic tools and modern technology. In conclusion, you will apply your knowledge of triangles as you investigate the mathematics of trigonometry.

In Geometry B, you will review the volume formulas for some common solid figures as you extend your knowledge of two-dimensional shapes to three-dimensional shapes. You will also transition from primarily Euclidean geometry to analytical geometry—a segment of geometry focused on numerical measurements and coordinate algebra. You will use analytical geometry and observations to investigate the properties of circles and constructions related to circles. Geometry B closes with a study of independent and conditional probability and how you can use probability models to represent situations arising in everyday life.

Integrated Math 1A is a comprehensive collection of mathematical concepts designed to give you a deeper understanding of the world around you. It includes ideas from algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and trigonometry, and teaches them as interrelated disciplines. It’s likely that you’ve been studying some form of integrated math since elementary school. In Integrated Math 1A, you will begin with algebra. You will build on your understanding of single-variable and two-variable expressions, equations, and inequalities. You will also learn how to write equations and inequalities to represent and solve word problems.

In Integrated Math 1B, you will explore the connections between algebra and geometry. You will learn about functions and use them to solve real-world math problems. You will study data collection methods and use different types of data plots to represent and analyze statistical data. You will learn geometric theorems and rules and write proofs to support them. You will also explore congruency and similarity of triangles.

Integrated Math 2A is a comprehensive collection of mathematical concepts designed to give you a deeper understanding of the world around you. It includes ideas from algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and trigonometry, and teaches these subjects as interrelated disciplines. It’s likely that you’ve been studying some form of integrated math since elementary school. In Integrated Math 2A, you will begin with polynomial expressions, including rational expressions. You will learn about quadratic equations and inequalities and solve them to find answers to real-world math problems. Finally, you will use this knowledge to examine polynomial functions.

In Integrated Math 2B, you will study the connections between algebra and geometry. You will learn about functions and use them to solve real-world math problems. You will study data collection methods, and you will use different types of data plots to represent and analyze statistical data. You will learn about geometric theorems and rules and write proofs to support them. You will also explore congruency and similarity of triangles.

Integrated Math 3A is a comprehensive collection of mathematical concepts designed to give you a deeper understanding of the world around you. It includes ideas from algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and trigonometry, and teaches them as interrelated disciplines. It’s likely that you’ve been studying some form of integrated math since elementary school. In Integrated Math 3A, you will understand and work with polynomial expressions, including rational expressions. You will also examine the relationship between equations and functions and analyze trigonometric functions in detail.

In Integrated Math 3B, you will study and apply the laws of sine and cosine functions. You will also investigate the cross sections and density of three-dimensional geometric figures. You will use equations, inequalities, and functions to solve real-world math problems. You will also look at function graphs and explore transformation of functions. You will analyze statistical data and data collection methods and use probability to make decisions.

Consumer Mathematics – When you buy goods and services, you are acting as a consumer. For example, you might buy a sandwich for lunch or pay a hair stylist for a haircut. Consumer Mathematics is designed to teach you about real-life financial situations that require everyday math skills. As a consumer, you will be earning, spending, and saving money. This course will help you make educated and responsible decisions regarding your finances. In this course, you will learn practical applications of math. You will learn how to plan a budget, manage bank accounts, and figure the cost of a good or service. You will also learn about taxes, payroll deductions, and how to invest and borrow money. This course will help you make informed decisions about buying or renting a home or car and teach you how to protect your purchases and investments with insurance. Finally, you will study economics, or the science of the creation, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. You’ll see how economics affects you as an individual and how it affects the country as a whole.

Precalculus A – Studying higher algebra and trigonometry leads to a better understanding of calculus. In Precalculus A, you will explore and build your knowledge of inverse, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions; trigonometric identities; complex numbers; and vectors. You will also apply this knowledge to realworld situations.

Precalculus B encompasses the rudiments of calculus, analytical geometry, and trigonometry. In Precalculus B, you will explore and build your knowledge of conic sections, matrices, sequences, induction, and probability and apply this knowledge to real-world situations. You will also study basic concepts of calculus, such as the limits of a function and area under the curve.

Probability and Statistics is a mathematics course that teaches two related, but distinguishable disciplines. Probability is the study of the likelihood that an event will occur. For example, what is the likelihood that you will win a writing contest if there are 3,000 entries? What are the chances that you will land that lead role in the school play if 30 students audition? In statistics, you will practice the science of collecting and analyzing numerical data in order to make decisions. The study of statistics upholds that of probability. You’ve likely worked with both disciplines to varying degrees during your math education. In this course, you will represent and interpret data using dot plots, histograms, box plots, two-way frequency tables, and scatter plots. You will study normal distributions and distinguish between correlation and causation. You will also determine the conditional probability of two events or whether the events are independent. Using counting techniques and the rules of probability, you will calculate probabilities and use the results to make educated and fair decisions. You will evaluate several data collection techniques and statistical models, including simulations. The course closes with information on how you can use probability models to represent situations arising in everyday life that involve both payoff and risk.


SCIENCE

Biology, Semester A, is a single-semester course designed to strengthen your knowledge of basic biology. The first unit provides an introduction to biology and biochemistry. It focuses on the roles of and differences between plant and animal cells. In the second unit, you’ll learn about the functions of different organ systems. The third unit covers cell division and the role of DNA and chromosomes in passing traits from parents to offspring.

Biology, Semester B, is a single-semester course designed to strengthen your knowledge of biology concepts. The first unit focuses on the classification, characteristics and biological processes of living organisms. In the second unit, you’ll study evolutionary mechanisms and the impact of environmental factors on species over time. The third unit focuses on the conservation of energy as it relates to living things and different ecosystems. In the last unit, you’ll explore how different ecosystems are interdependent.

Chemistry A – Chemistry is the study of matter and how it changes. This course looks at matter’s composition, properties, and transformations. In this semester, you’ll explore the structure and properties of matter. You’ll analyze and construct the periodic table of elements. You’ll compare elements based on their atomic structures and relative positions in the periodic table. You will also discuss the chemical bonding taking place in ionic and covalent compounds and metals. Finally, you’ll predict the outcome of chemical reactions based on the reactants involved. This course looks at matter’s composition, properties, and transformations. In this semester, you will calculate the theoretical quantities of substances involved in a chemical reaction through the study of stoichiometry. You’ll analyze chemical reactions that involve aqueous solutions, acids and bases, and gases. You’ll see how gases respond to changes in pressure, volume, temperature, and quantity through the ideal gas law. You’ll also calculate changes in temperature caused by physical and chemical processes and analyze reactions in terms of bond energies. Finally, you will understand how atoms are changed by the unique processes of radioactive decay, nuclear fusion, and nuclear fission.

Chemistry B – Chemistry is the study of matter and how it changes. The course looks at matter’s composition, properties, and transformations. In this semester, you will calculate the theoretical quantities of substances involved in a chemical reaction through the study of stoichiometry. You’ll analyze chemical reactions that involve aqueous solutions, acids and bases, and gases. You’ll see how gases respond to changes in pressure, volume, temperature, and quantity through the ideal gas law. You’ll also calculate changes in temperature caused by physical and chemical processes and analyze reactions in terms of bond energies. Finally, you will understand how atoms are changed by the unique processes of radioactive decay, nuclear fusion, and nuclear fission.

Earth and Space Science A – Earth and space science is the study of the structure of our planet and Earth’s role in the solar system and universe. This branch of science relies on observations, historical data, and physical evidence to describe the natural processes that occur around us and in distant space. Semester A begins with a discussion of the methods and tools that scientists use to study Earth and space science, including the scientific method, modeling, and mathematics. You’ll look at theories for how the planets, solar system, and universe formed and explain the interactions between the Sun, Earth, and Moon. You’ll also learn about the emergence of Earth’s materials, atmosphere, and first lifeforms, as well as the dating methods that help us piece together Earth’s unique history.

Earth and Space Science B – Earth and space science is the study of the structure of our planet and Earth’s role in the solar system and universe. This branch of science relies on observations, historical data, and physical evidence to describe the natural processes that occur around us and in distant space. You’ll begin Semester B by comparing the composition of rocks and minerals and analyzing the processes involved in the rock cycle. You’ll explore the tectonic mechanisms that lead to some of Earth’s most prominent geological features. Next, you’ll study important interactions between the hydrosphere and atmosphere and the role they play in weathering and erosion. You’ll also differentiate between weather and climate and make evidence-based predictions about both using data and modeling. The last unit in this course highlights the negative effects that humans can have on the natural cycles of Earth, as well as effective measures we can take to protect our planet.

Physical Science A – Science is the study of the natural world. It relies on experimentation and evidence to describe the natural events that occur around us. Physical science is the study of matter and energy. In Physical Science A, you’ll describe the atomic and molecular structure of substances using models. You will investigate how chemical reactions involve energy and lead to changes in properties of substances. You’ll also model different kinds of forces and the effect they have on the motion of objects. You’ll solve problems involving work and power and apply these principles to simple machines. Finally, you will see how simple machines make up more complex machines that are important in our lives.

Physical Science B – Science is the study of the natural world. It relies on experimentation and evidence to describe the natural events that occur around us. Physical science is the study of matter and energy. In Physical Science B, you’ll investigate gravitational, electric, and magnetic force fields and identify factors that determine their strength. You’ll apply concepts of electricity and magnetism to explain how motors, generators, and electromagnets work. You will discuss energy transformations in objects and systems, including how heat flows between objects that are at different temperatures. You will model how sound and light travel as waves and how they interact with different forms of matter. Finally, you’ll explore how electromagnetic waves help us communicate with one another and collect information about the universe.

Physics A – Physics is one of the three main fields of science, along with biology and chemistry. If asked what biology and chemistry deal with, most of us can come up with a one-word answer: life and chemicals respectively. Physics though, often seems like a grab bag of topics, including motion, magnets, machines, light, sound, and electrical circuits. The common thread running through all these things is that they each illustrate some very basic mathematical laws in our physical world. In brief, physics is the scientific study of matter, energy, and their most fundamental physical interactions, including attractions, repulsions, and collisions. In Physics A, you will learn about the “basics” of physics: how to describe and analyze motion, how forces interact with matter, and how to further describe these interactions with the aid of the concepts of energy and momentum. Finally, you’ll explore one more specialized topic, thermodynamics, the physics of heat.

Physics B – Physics is one of the three main fields of science, along with biology and chemistry. If asked what biology and chemistry deal with, most of us can come up with a one-word answer: life and chemicals respectively. Physics though, often seems like a grab bag of topics, including motion, magnets, machines, light, sound, and electrical circuits. The common thread running through all these things is that they each illustrate some basic mathematical laws in our physical world. In brief, physics is the scientific study of matter, energy, and their most fundamental physical interactions, including attractions, repulsions, and collisions. In Physics B, you will use your physical understanding of motion, forces and energy and apply that knowledge to some important, specialized topics in physics: the behavior of waves, applications of wave theory to light and optics, the interaction of electrical and magnetic forces, and the special “non-Newtonian” properties of energy and matter described by quantum theory.


SOCIAL STUDIES

Anthropology – The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present, future and address the problems humans face in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world will also be presented in the course.

Archaeology – The course further provides students a conceptual tool by which to understand how economic, social, cultural, political and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations will all be explored in this course.Students will cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in both business activities and the 21st Century.

Civics A – A citizen is a person who is legally recognized by a state and entitled to the state’s rights and privileges. Civics is the study of the rights and duties of such a person. One of the best ways to understand your rights and duties as a citizen is to study the government that defines and upholds them. In Civics A, you will learn about politics and government, and you’ll analyze democracy which is the system of government used in the United States. Finally, you will examine the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the U.S. Government. A course in Civics teaches you how to actively participate in governance and how you can help improve the quality of governance at all levels.

Civics B – A citizen is a person who is legally recognized by a state and entitled to the state’s rights and privileges. Civics is the study of the rights and duties of such a person. One of the best ways to understand your rights and duties is to study the government that defines and upholds them. In Civics B, you will learn how Americans are linked to the government and each other through the media and a number of political parties. You will also take a detailed look at civic responsibility and what it means to be a contributing member of society. Finally, you will study how and why the U.S. creates certain goods and services and you’ll see how political and economic decisions made at home can affect foreign policy abroad.

The Contemporary World, Semester A, is a single-semester course designed to strengthen your knowledge about the modern world. In the first unit, you will explore how geography can help you gain a better understanding of the world and its people. In the second unit, you will learn about the influence of culture on the world. In the third unit, you will discover the relationship between art and society and study migration and population distribution. In the last unit, you will learn about the effect of physical processes on the environment and look at the ways people have adapted to and modified physical environments.

The Contemporary World, Semester B, is a single-semester course designed to strengthen your understanding of government in the modern world. In the first unit, you will study the role of government and the responsibilities of citizens in contemporary societies. In the second unit, you will learn about democracy in the United States, and you will look at the structure of the Constitution. In the third unit, you will explore the functions of the US legal system as well as understand the rights and responsibilities of US citizens. Toward the end of this course, you will learn about the factors affecting the development of global trade and examine the structure and function of the US economy.

Economics is a social science that examines how goods and services are created, consumed, and exchanged. This course covers basic economic problems such as scarcity, choice, and effective use of resources. It also covers topics on a larger scale such as market structures and international trade. It particularly focuses on the US economy and analyzes the role of the government and the Federal Reserve System.

Philosophy – This course will take you on an exciting adventure that covers more than 2500 years. Along the way, you’ll run into some very strange characters. For example, you’ll read about a man who hung out on street corners, barefoot and dirty, pestering everyone he met with questions. You’ll read about another man who climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed. Despite their odd behavior, these and other philosophers of the Western world are among the most brilliant and influential thinkers of all time. As you read about them, you’ll see where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western civilization came from. You’ll also get a chance to ask yourself some of the same questions these great thinkers pondered. At the end, you’ll have a better understanding of yourself and the world around you, from atoms to outer space and everything in between.

Psychology A – This one-semester course is intended for you to familiarize yourself with the concepts and theories of psychology. This course has 13 lessons and 5 Course Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. In Psychology, Semester A, you will trace the history of psychology and examine key psychological theories. You will discuss human development and explain how the nervous and endocrine systems affect human development and behavior. You will explain various theories related to language development and acquisition. You will discuss the influence of heredity, environment, society, and culture on human behavior.

Psychology B – This one-semester course is intended for you to familiarize yourself with various theories of psychology and analyze human behavior. This course has 12 lessons and 5 Course Activities. Each lesson contains one or more Lesson Activities. In Psychology, Semester B, you will explain the established theories of cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development. You will identify the factors that influence interpersonal relationships, recognize the origins and effects of violence, and describe prevention and treatment options for addictive behavior. You will explain abnormal behavior and describe different types of psychological disorders. You will trace the history of psychological counseling and therapy and describe strategies used for problem solving and coping with stress. You will describe some key statistical concepts used in psychological research and testing, and identify career opportunities in psychology.

Social Problems I – Students will learn more about the challenges facing societies and the relationships between societies, governments, and individuals in these areas. Each unit will focus on a particular area of social concern, often with a global view, and examine possible solutions at both a structural and individual level.

The Social Problems II course continues to examine the social problems that affect individuals and societies in the world today. Students learn about the overall structure of the social problem as well as how it impacts their lives. Each unit focuses on a particular social problem, including racial discrimination, drug abuse, the loss of community, and urban sprawl, and discusses possible solutions at both individual and structural levels. Students examine the connections in each issue between societies, individuals, governments, and the global arena.

Sociology I – The world is becoming more complex. How do your beliefs, values and behavior affect the people around you and the world we live in? In this increasingly connected world, students will examine problems in our society and learn how human relationships can influence the life of the student.Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world are also presented in the course.

Sociology II – Sociology is the study of people, social life and society. The development of a sociological imagination will enable students to examine how society shapes human actions and beliefs, and how such actions and beliefs in turn shape society. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the sociological world are also presented in the course.

US Government is the study of the founding principles of democracy in the United States, the structures and details of how the government functions, and the role of the individual citizen in participating in that democracy. In US Government, you will learn about the principles and events that led to the founding of the United States in the eighteenth century; examine how the operations of the US government are spread among three branches of government and distributed between the national, state, and federal levels of government; explore the role of the individual citizen in the operations of the government; and, finally, apply these concepts to understanding the concrete areas of foreign, domestic, and economic policy. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other and to the structures of government that exist today, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how government structures were designed. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts to develop credible explanations of how and why the government exists as it does. You’ll then use that evidence to express viewpoints on the operations of government by writing essays and creating presentations about topics of relevance to modern US citizens.

US History A – US History is the study of the events, people, and culture of the United States over time. In US History A, you will learn about the process of historical inquiry, review the events and principles
behind the founding of the United States, and then apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events from the Civil War through the Great Depression. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time by writing essays and creating presentations about broad periods of historical development.

US History B – US History is the study of the events, people, and culture of the United States over time. In US History B, you will apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events of US history from World War II to the present, including the Cold War, Civil Rights and other social movements, the Vietnam War, modern presidencies, and responses to global terrorism. You’ll explore timelines to
gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time.

World Geography A – Geography is the study of where things are in the world. It is important to know why people settled where they did: sometimes this is for weather-related reasons, and sometimes it’s because of bountiful natural resources nearby. In this course, you will learn about these special features which drive economic development and form the locales where people settle.

World Geography B – Geography is the study of where things are in the world. It is important to know why people settled where they did: sometimes this is for weather-related reasons, and sometimes it’s because of bountiful natural resources nearby. In this course, you will learn about these special features which drive economic development and form the locales where people settle.

In World History, Semester A, you’ll explore major historical events around the world. In the first unit, you’ll develop your historical thinking skills. In the second unit, you’ll examine the origins and developments of European exploration. In the third unit, you’ll learn about the causes and effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation. In the fourth unit, you’ll explore revolutions that occurred from 1789 to 1848, including the Scientific Revolution, the American Revolution, and the French Revolution. In the fifth unit, you’ll explore the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution, the spread of nationalism in Europe, and the Russian Revolution.

In World History, Semester B, you’ll explore major historical events around the world. In the first unit, you’ll analyze imperialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and examine the causes and consequences of World War I. In the second unit, you’ll study World War II, analyzing the factors that started the war and the impact of the war. In the third unit, you’ll explore the rise and fall of communism in the Soviet Union and China and learn about the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. In the fourth unit, you’ll analyze the effects of decolonization in Southeast Asia and Africa. You’ll also study the modernization of China and the rise of nationalism in the Middle East. In the last unit, you’ll explore economic globalization and evaluate the benefits and challenges of living in the modern world.


WORLD LANGUAGE

German 1A – Learning a language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The German-speaking world spans Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and Liechtenstein in Europe, as well as many other parts of the world. In German 1A, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people communicate, such as exchanging names and greetings, describing people by physical and personality traits, and describing family members and aspects of your social life. You’ll start with basic sentence structures and grammatical tools, and you’ll communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the German speaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your German studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

German 1B – Learning a new language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The German-speaking world spans Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and Liechtenstein in Europe, as well as many other parts of the world. In German 1B, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people describe how to earn, save, and manage money, modes of urban transportation, various seasons and the associated weather conditions, food, clothes, and activities. You’ll also describe various art forms, plays, concerts, and movies. You’ll discuss health and well-being, and travel and tourism. You’ll build on what you learned in the German 1A course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the German-speaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your German studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

German 2A – Learning a language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The German-speaking world spans Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and Liechtenstein in Europe, as well as many other parts of the world. In German 2A, you’ll be reintroduced to German in common situations, beginning with describing classes, school friends, teachers, and school supplies. You’ll discuss different styles of dressing, housing and neighborhoods, and learn about relationships between family members and friends, students and teachers, and employees and employer. You’ll also describe daily personal routines and schedules, household chores, and family responsibilities. Finally, you’ll discuss different types of cuisine, dining establishments, and dining etiquette. You’ll build on what you learned in the German 1B course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the German-speaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your German studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

German 2B – Learning a language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The German-speaking world spans Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and Liechtenstein in Europe, as well as many other parts of the world. In German 2B, you’ll be reintroduced to German in common situations, beginning with various professions and career plans for the future. You’ll discuss traveling to various regions and the flora and fauna found in each region and describe types of trips, including road trips, camping, and ecotourism. You’ll also describe hobbies, activities, and crafts that people enjoy. Finally, you’ll discuss medical specialists, including dentists and veterinarians, and symptoms related to illness and injury. You’ll build on what you learned in the German 2A course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the German-speaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your German studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

Spanish 1A – Learning a language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The Spanish-speaking world is vast and rich, spanning Spain in the Iberian Peninsula and many parts of North, Central, and South America, all with varied ethnic and political histories and cultures. In Spanish 1A, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people communicate, such as exchanging names and greetings, describing people by physical and personality traits, and describing family members and aspects of your social life. You’ll start with basic sentence structures and grammatical tools, and you’ll learn to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanish-speaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

Spanish 1B – Learning a new language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The Spanish-speaking world is vast and rich, spanning Spain in the Iberian Peninsula and many parts of North, Central, and South America, all with varied ethnic and political histories and cultures. In Spanish 1B, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people describe how to earn, save, and manage money, modes of urban transportation, various seasons and the associated weather conditions, food, clothes, and activities. You’ll also describe various art forms, plays, concerts, and movies. You’ll discuss health and well-being and travel and tourism. You’ll build on what you learned in the Spanish 1B course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanish-speaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

Spanish 2A – In Spanish 2A, you’ll be reintroduced to Spanish in common situations, beginning with describing classes, school friends, teachers, and school supplies. You’ll discuss different styles of dressing, housing and neighborhoods, and learn about relationships between family members and friends, students and teachers, and employees and employer. You’ll also describe daily personal routines and schedules, household chores and family responsibilities. Finally, you’ll discuss different types of cuisine, dining establishments, and dining etiquette. You’ll build on what you learned in Spanish 1B to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanishspeaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

In Spanish 2B, you’ll be reintroduced to Spanish in common situations, beginning with various professions and career plans for the future. You’ll discuss traveling to different regions and the flora and fauna found in each region and describe different types of trips, including road trips, camping, and ecotourism. You’ll also describe different hobbies, activities, and crafts that people enjoy. Finally, you’ll discuss about different medical specialists, including dentists and veterinarians, and describe symptoms related to illness and injury. You’ll build on what you learned in the Spanish 2A course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanishspeaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

In Spanish 3A, you’ll be reintroduced to Spanish in common situations, beginning with various daily routines, describing friends and family, childhood memories and activities, and childhood hopes and aspirations. You’ll discuss and describe art, such as paintings and sculptures, and literature, such as novels and novellas, and give reactions and form opinions about art and literature. You’ll also understand the process of selecting and applying to a university, aspirations at the university, and dealing with leaving home and moving into a dormitory. Further, you will describe university life and expectations from the university experience. You’ll explore the dynamics and challenges of multiethnic and developing societies, environmental and social issues, causes and possible resolutions, and learning about unfamiliar countries using technology. Finally, you’ll discuss current events reported in the media, different types of classified and other types of advertisement in the media (both print and online), the sections and supplements of a newspaper or magazine, and various jobs available in the media. You’ll build on what you learned in Spanish 2 to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanish-speaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

In Spanish 3B, you’ll be reintroduced to Spanish in a variety of situations, beginning with multiculturalism, bilingualism, cultural influences on traditions, customs, food, and social experiences, and legends and folklore from different cultures. You’ll discuss and describe genres of music, poetry, drama, and short stories, and proverbs from different cultures. You’ll also explore how geographical features affect the weather, and how the geography and weather affect the clothing, food, and livelihoods of the local population. You’ll also understand the history of Venezuela and how the Spanish conquerors and indigenous people shaped the culture of the country, and you’ll learn about the South American independence movement, including some significant freedom fighters and their struggles to win independence. You will also discuss religions practiced in Argentina, the cultural icons of the country and how they compare to cultural icons from other countries, sports and activities in Argentina, some national symbols, such as the gauchos, and idioms and sayings from Argentina. Finally, you’ll discuss types of wildlife and natural and agricultural resources found in Costa Rica, the human resources of the country that help overcome economic and natural disasters, and how to write formal and informal letters to share experiences. You’ll build on what you learned in Spanish 3A to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanish-speaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

Chinese 1A – Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Chinese 1B – Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Chinese 2A – Students continue their study of Chinese by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus of the course and students are expected to learn several characters each unit. However, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in listening and reading comprehension. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2, the course is conducted almost entirely in Chinese. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Chinese 2B – Students continue their study of Chinese by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus of the course and students are expected to learn several characters each unit. However, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in listening and reading comprehension. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2, the course is conducted almost entirely in Chinese. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

In French 1A, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people communicate, such as exchanging names and greetings, describing people by physical and personality traits, and describing family members and aspects of your social life. You’ll start with basic sentence structures and grammatical tools, and you’ll communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Frenchspeaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your French studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

In French 1B, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people describe how to earn, save, and manage money, modes of urban transportation, various seasons and the associated weather conditions, food, clothes, and activities. You’ll also describe various art forms, plays, concerts, and movies. You’ll discuss health and well-being, and travel and tourism. You’ll build on what you learned in the French 1A course and communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the French-speaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your French studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

In French 2A, you’ll be reintroduced to French in common situations, beginning with describing classes, school friends, teachers, and school supplies. You’ll discuss different styles of dressing, housing and neighborhoods, and learn about relationships between family members and friends, students and teachers, and employees and employer. You’ll also describe daily personal routines and schedules, household chores and family responsibilities. Finally, you’ll discuss different types of cuisine, dining establishments and dining etiquette. You’ll build on what you learned in the French 1B course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the French-speaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your French studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

In French 2B, you’ll be reintroduced to French in common situations, beginning with various professions and career plans for the future. You’ll discuss traveling to different regions and the flora and fauna found in each region and describe different types of trips, including road trips, camping, and ecotourism. You’ll also describe different hobbies, activities, and crafts that people enjoy. Finally, you’ll discuss about different medical specialists, including dentists and veterinarians, and describe symptoms related to illness and injury. You’ll build on what you learned in the French 2A course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Frenchspeaking world where the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your French studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

French 3A – This course builds on knowledge that students acquired in the beginning-level courses, French I and II, and aligns with national ACTFL standards. Students learn to express themselves using present, past, future, and conditional tense verbs in increasingly complex grammatical constructions. They become familiar with idiomatic expressions common to daily French speaking and build vocabulary in order to be able to converse on a wider variety of themes in French. Instruction includes more material on French culture, geography, and history than in earlier courses, giving students the opportunity to learn about France and other francophone countries around the world.

French 3B – This course builds on knowledge that students acquired in the beginning-level courses, French I and II, and aligns with national ACTFL standards. Students learn to express themselves using present, past, future, and conditional tense verbs in increasingly complex grammatical constructions. They become familiar with idiomatic expressions common to daily French speaking and build vocabulary in order to be able to converse on a wider variety of themes in French. Instruction includes more material on French culture, geography, and history than in earlier courses, giving students the opportunity to learn about France and other francophone countries around the world.

Latin 1A – This two-semester course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Latin grammar. Students develop the skills necessary to translate basic sentences from Latin into English and from English into Latin, and to read simple connected passages of Latin prose and poetry. In the process, students learn how verb conjugations and noun declensions work in a highly inflected language and how to analyze the structure of Latin sentences. The course includes a cross-cultural component, introducing students to the world of ancient Rome by allowing them to acquire knowledge—through word study—of Roman institutions, practices, religious beliefs, and ideological ways of thought.

Latin 1B – This two-semester course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Latin grammar. Students develop the skills necessary to translate basic sentences from Latin into English and from English into Latin, and to read simple connected passages of Latin prose and poetry. In the process, students learn how verb conjugations and noun declensions work in a highly inflected language and how to analyze the structure of Latin sentences. The course includes a cross-cultural component, introducing students to the world of ancient Rome by allowing them to acquire knowledge—through word study—of Roman institutions, practices, religious beliefs, and ideological ways of thought.

Latin 2A builds on the foundation in Latin grammar provided by the Latin I course and also includes an in-depth study of Roman mythology and history. Students expand their use of declensions, adjectives, adverbs, and cases. These skills enable them to translate longer Latin texts into English that require a more complex knowledge of grammar rather than just vocabulary. To practice oral Latin skills, students engage in conversations, seek and give items of information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Latin II also takes students on a tour of the ancient classical world, including literature, historical workers, and the lives of famous and influential Romans.

Latin 2B builds on the foundation in Latin grammar provided by the Latin I course and also includes an in-depth study of Roman mythology and history. Students expand their use of declensions, adjectives, adverbs, and cases. These skills enable them to translate longer Latin texts into English that require a more complex knowledge of grammar rather than just vocabulary. To practice oral Latin skills, students engage in conversations, seek and give items of information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Latin II also takes students on a tour of the ancient classical world, including literature, historical workers, and the lives of famous and influential Romans.



CREDIT RECOVERY

Algebra 1, Semester A, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on the relationships of linear and nonlinear equations. You’ll learn to create, graph, and solve linear and exponential equations and inequalities. You’ll also use function notation to describe relationships between quantities and interpret function notation accurately to solve problems. Toward the end of this course, you’ll study transformations of linear and exponential functions.

Algebra 1, Semester B, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on the relationship of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions. You will create, graph, and solve quadratic equations and inequalities in one or two variables. You will also add, subtract, and multiply linear and quadratic polynomials. At the end of this course, you’ll interpret, analyze, and build functions.

Algebra 2, Semester A, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on the interpretation of polynomial and rational expressions. You’ll learn to create, graph, and solve equations and inequalities. You’ll also identify the key features of different types of functions and analyze them with tables, graphs, and equations.

Algebra 2, Semester B, is a single-semester course designed to cultivate and periodically assess your subject-matter knowledge while strengthening your mathematical skills. This course includes lessons that focus on function transformations on the coordinate plane, the inverse of functions, and the properties of functions. You’ll learn to create and graph trigonometric functions and identify their key features. Toward the end of this course, you will build your understanding of the key concepts of probability and statistics.

Biology, Semester A, is a single-semester course designed to strengthen your knowledge of basic biology. The first unit provides an introduction to biology and biochemistry. It focuses on the roles of and differences between plant and animal cells. In the second unit, you’ll learn about the functions of different organ systems. The third unit covers cell division and the role of DNA and chromosomes in passing traits from parents to offspring.

Biology, Semester B, is a single-semester course designed to strengthen your knowledge of biology concepts. The first unit focuses on the classification, characteristics and biological processes of living organisms. In the second unit, you’ll study evolutionary mechanisms and the impact of environmental factors on species over time. The third unit focuses on the conservation of energy as it relates to living things and different ecosystems. In the last unit, you’ll explore how different ecosystems are interdependent.

Chemistry A – Chemistry is the study of matter and how it changes. This course looks at matter’s composition, properties, and transformations. In this semester, you’ll explore the structure and properties of
matter. You’ll analyze and construct the periodic table of elements. You’ll compare elements based on their atomic structures and relative positions in the periodic table. You will also discuss the chemical bonding taking place in ionic and covalent compounds and metals. Finally, you’ll predict the outcome of chemical reactions based on the reactants involved. This course looks at matter’s composition, properties, and transformations. In this semester, you will calculate the theoretical quantities of substances involved in a chemical reaction through the study of stoichiometry. You’ll analyze chemical reactions that involve aqueous solutions, acids and bases, and gases. You’ll see how gases respond to changes in pressure, volume, temperature, and quantity through the ideal gas law. You’ll also calculate changes in
temperature caused by physical and chemical processes and analyze reactions in terms of bond energies. Finally, you will understand how atoms are changed by the unique processes of radioactive decay, nuclear fusion, and nuclear fission.

Chemistry B – Chemistry is the study of matter and how it changes. The course looks at matter’s composition, properties, and transformations. In this semester, you will calculate the theoretical quantities of substances involved in a chemical reaction through the study of stoichiometry. You’ll analyze chemical reactions that involve aqueous solutions, acids and bases, and gases. You’ll see how gases respond to changes in pressure, volume, temperature, and quantity through the ideal gas law. You’ll also calculate changes in temperature caused by physical and chemical processes and analyze reactions in terms of bond energies. Finally, you will understand how atoms are changed by the unique processes of radioactive decay, nuclear fusion, and nuclear fission.

Earth and Space Science A – Earth and space science is the study of the structure of our planet and Earth’s role in the solar system and universe. This branch of science relies on observations, historical data, and physical evidence to describe the natural processes that occur around us and in distant space. Semester A begins with a discussion of the methods and tools that scientists use to study Earth and space science, including the scientific method, modeling, and mathematics. You’ll look at theories for how the planets, solar system, and universe formed and explain the interactions between the Sun, Earth, and Moon. You’ll also learn about the emergence of Earth’s materials, atmosphere, and first lifeforms, as well as the dating methods that help us piece together Earth’s unique history.

Earth and Space Science B – Earth and space science is the study of the structure of our planet and Earth’s role in the solar system and universe. This branch of science relies on observations, historical data, and physical evidence to describe the natural processes that occur around us and in distant space. You’ll begin Semester B by comparing the composition of rocks and minerals and analyzing the processes involved in the rock cycle. You’ll explore the tectonic mechanisms that lead to some of Earth’s most prominent geological features. Next, you’ll study important interactions between the hydrosphere and atmosphere and the role they play in weathering and erosion. You’ll also differentiate between weather and climate and make evidence-based predictions about both using data and modeling. The last unit in this course highlights the negative effects that humans can have on the natural cycles of Earth, as well as effective measures we can take to protect our planet.

Economics is a social science that examines how goods and services are created, consumed, and exchanged. This course covers basic economic problems such as scarcity, choice, and effective use of resources. It also covers topics on a larger scale such as market structures and international trade. It particularly focuses on the US economy and analyzes the role of the government and the Federal Reserve System.

English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 9A, you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In English 9A, you will read and analyze literature in different genres as well as practice skills related to good study habits. You will sharpen your writing skills as you evaluate literary works with regard to literary technique, form, and theme.

In English 9B, you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In English 9B, you will read and analyze Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, as well as read speeches and essays to evaluate their arguments. You will write evaluations of literary works with regard to literary techniques, form, and theme.

English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 10A you will explore the different literary devices used in short stories, such as subject, theme, mood, plot, and narration. You will read and analyze a variety of literary works to learn more about a particular literary device. The second unit covers many types of informational texts. In the third unit, you will read and study drama from a range of eras. In addition, you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills. In English 10A, you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics.

English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 10B you will explore characteristics of different genres of fiction, such as realistic fiction, historical fiction, and science fiction, and analyze historical context, theme, and genre in Franz Kafka’s novella The Metamorphosis. The second unit covers many types of nonfiction writing, including memoirs, personal essays, public essays, speeches, and narrative nonfiction. In the third unit, you will analyze traits and genres of poetry. In addition, you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills. In English 10B, you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics.

English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 11A you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In English 11A, you will read and analyze different genres in literature with an emphasis on American literary movements over time. You will also complete writing activities to evaluate literary works with regard to literary techniques, form, and theme.

In English 11B you will study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension and writing skills. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, and narrative. In English 11B, you will read and analyze a variety of literary genres with an emphasis on modern American literature and literary movements. You will also complete writing activities to evaluate various literary works in regard to literary techniques, form, and theme.

English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 12A you will explore the relation between British history and literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the neoclassical era, including the works of Shakespeare. You will read and analyze a variety of literary works from this time period using relevant cultural and political history presented in each lesson. In English 12A you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In addition you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills.

English is the study of the creation and analysis of literature written in the English language. In English 12B you will explore the relation between British history and literature from the romantic period to the modern era. You will read and analyze a variety of literary works from this time period in the context of relevant cultural and political history. In English 12B you will also study a variety of techniques to improve your reading comprehension, writing skills, and grammar and mechanics. The instruction covers many types of writing: creative, descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive. In addition you will complete writing activities in which you will employ analytical and persuasive skills.

In Geometry A, you will explore rigid and non-rigid transformations of figures in the coordinate plane and use them to establish congruence and similarity of triangles and other shapes. You will also prove theorems about lines, angles, triangles, and parallelograms, and build geometric constructions using both basic tools and modern technology. In conclusion, you will apply your knowledge of triangles as you investigate the mathematics of trigonometry.

In Geometry B, you will review the volume formulas for some common solid figures as you extend your knowledge of two-dimensional shapes to three-dimensional shapes. You will also transition from primarily Euclidean geometry to analytical geometry—a segment of geometry focused on numerical measurements and coordinate algebra. You will use analytical geometry and observations to investigate the properties of circles and constructions related to circles. Geometry B closes with a study of independent and conditional probability and how you can use probability models to represent situations arising in everyday life.

Integrated Math is a comprehensive collection of mathematical concepts designed to give you a deeper understanding of the world around you. It includes ideas from algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and trigonometry, and teaches them as interrelated disciplines. It’s likely that you’ve been studying some form of integrated math since elementary school. In Integrated Math 1A, you will begin with algebra. You will build on your understanding of single-variable and two-variable expressions, equations, and inequalities. You will also learn how to write equations and inequalities to represent and solve word problems.

In Integrated Math 1B, you will explore the connections between algebra and geometry. You will learn about functions and use them to solve real-world math problems. You will study data collection methods and use different types of data plots to represent and analyze statistical data. You will learn geometric theorems and rules and write proofs to support them. You will also explore congruency and similarity of triangles.

Integrated Math is a comprehensive collection of mathematical concepts designed to give you a deeper understanding of the world around you. It includes ideas from algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and trigonometry, and teaches these subjects as interrelated disciplines. It’s likely that you’ve been studying some form of integrated math since elementary school. In Integrated Math 2A, you will begin with polynomial expressions, including rational expressions. You will learn about quadratic equations and inequalities and solve them to find answers to real-world math problems. Finally, you will use this knowledge to examine polynomial functions.

In Integrated Math 2B, you will study the connections between algebra and geometry. You will learn about functions and use them to solve real-world math problems. You will study data collection methods, and you will use different types of data plots to represent and analyze statistical data. You will learn about geometric theorems and rules and write proofs to support them. You will also explore congruency and similarity of triangles.

Integrated Math is a comprehensive collection of mathematical concepts designed to give you a deeper understanding of the world around you. It includes ideas from algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, and trigonometry, and teaches them as interrelated disciplines. It’s likely that you’ve been studying some form of integrated math since elementary school. In Integrated Math 3A, you will understand and work with polynomial expressions, including rational expressions. You will also examine the relationship between equations and functions and analyze trigonometric functions in detail.

In Integrated Math 3B, you will study and apply the laws of sine and cosine functions. You will also investigate the cross sections and density of three-dimensional geometric figures. You will use equations, inequalities, and functions to solve real-world math problems. You will also look at function graphs and explore transformation of functions. You will analyze statistical data and data collection methods and use probability to make decisions.

Science is the study of the natural world. It relies on experimentation and evidence to describe the natural events that occur around us. Physical science is the study of matter and energy. In Physical Science A, you’ll describe the atomic and molecular structure of substances using models. You will investigate how chemical reactions involve energy and lead to changes in properties of substances. You’ll also model different kinds of forces and the effect they have on the motion of objects. You’ll solve problems involving work and power and apply these principles to simple machines. Finally, you will see how simple machines make up more complex machines that are important in our lives.

Science is the study of the natural world. It relies on experimentation and evidence to describe the natural events that occur around us. Physical science is the study of matter and energy. In Physical Science B, you’ll investigate gravitational, electric, and magnetic force fields and identify factors that determine their strength. You’ll apply concepts of electricity and magnetism to explain how motors, generators, and electromagnets work. You will discuss energy transformations in objects and systems, including how heat flows between objects that are at different temperatures. You will model how sound and light travel as waves and how they interact with different forms of matter. Finally, you’ll explore how electromagnetic waves help us communicate with one another and collect information about the universe.

Learning a language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The Spanish-speaking world is vast and rich, spanning Spain in the Iberian Peninsula and many parts of North, Central, and South America, all with varied ethnic and political histories and cultures. In Spanish 1A, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people communicate, such as exchanging names and greetings, describing people by physical and personality traits, and describing family members and aspects of your social life. You’ll start with basic sentence structures and grammatical tools, and you’ll learn to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanish-speaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

Learning a new language is a multi-faceted experience in which you are introduced to a whole new set of words and ways of expressing yourself with words, along with new cultures formed by people who have been speaking that language for centuries. The Spanish-speaking world is vast and rich, spanning Spain in the Iberian Peninsula and many parts of North, Central, and South America, all with varied ethnic and political histories and cultures. In Spanish 1B, you’ll be introduced to several common situations in which people describe how to earn, save, and manage money, modes of urban transportation, various seasons and the associated weather conditions, food, clothes, and activities. You’ll also describe various art forms, plays, concerts, and movies. You’ll discuss health and well-being and travel and tourism. You’ll build on what you learned in the Spanish 1B course to communicate by listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish as you internalize new vocabulary and grammar. You’ll also learn about some regions of the Spanish-speaking world that the central characters of each unit are visiting. You will build on this semester’s work as you advance in your Spanish studies: everything that you learn about a language and the cultures in which it is spoken will serve as a foundation for further learning.

US Government is the study of the founding principles of democracy in the United States, the structures and details of how the government functions, and the role of the individual citizen in participating in that democracy. In US Government, you will learn about the principles and events that led to the founding of the United States in the eighteenth century; examine how the operations of the US government are spread among three branches of government and distributed between the national, state, and federal levels of government; explore the role of the individual citizen in the operations of the government; and, finally, apply these concepts to understanding the concrete areas of foreign, domestic, and economic policy. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other and to the structures of government that exist today, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how government structures were designed. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts to develop credible explanations of how and why the government exists as it does. You’ll then use that evidence to express viewpoints on the operations of government by writing essays and creating presentations about topics of relevance to modern US citizens.

US History is the study of the events, people, and culture of the United States over time. In US History A, you will learn about the process of historical inquiry, review the events and principles behind the founding of the United States, and then apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events from the Civil War through the Great Depression. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time by writing essays and creating presentations about broad periods of historical development.

US History is the study of the events, people, and culture of the United States over time. In US History B, you will apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events of US history from World War II to the present, including the Cold War, Civil Rights and other social movements, the Vietnam War, modern presidencies, and responses to global terrorism. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time.

World Geography A – Geography is the study of where things are in the world. It is important to know why people settled where they did: sometimes this is for weather-related reasons, and sometimes it’s because of bountiful natural resources nearby. In this course, you will learn about these special features which drive economic development and form the locales where people settle.

World Geography B – Geography is the study of where things are in the world. It is important to know why people settled where they did: sometimes this is for weather-related reasons, and sometimes it’s because of bountiful natural resources nearby. In this course, you will learn about these special features which drive economic development and form the locales where people settle.

In World History, Semester A, you’ll explore major historical events around the world. In the first unit, you’ll develop your historical thinking skills. In the second unit, you’ll examine the origins and developments of European exploration. In the third unit, you’ll learn about the causes and effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation. In the fourth unit, you’ll explore revolutions that occurred from 1789 to 1848, including the Scientific Revolution, the American Revolution, and the French Revolution. In the fifth unit, you’ll explore the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution, the spread of nationalism in Europe, and the Russian Revolution.

In World History, Semester B, you’ll explore major historical events around the world. In the first unit, you’ll analyze imperialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and examine the causes and consequences of World War I. In the second unit, you’ll study World War II, analyzing the factors that started the war and the impact of the war. In the third unit, you’ll explore the rise and fall of communism in the Soviet Union and China and learn about the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. In the fourth unit, you’ll analyze the effects of decolonization in Southeast Asia and Africa. You’ll also study the modernization of China and the rise of nationalism in the Middle East. In the last unit, you’ll explore economic globalization and evaluate the benefits and challenges of living in the modern world.